I ran across a very worthwhile article today. It explains very clearly the urgent reasons we need to create a resilient local society, and the main things we can do to give our efforts the best chance of being worthwhile. I’m not going to paraphrase it. It’s best if you read the original article, and check the references, and then comment on this blog if you have ideas about what we should be doing locally:

http://www.resilience.org/stories/2012-12-10/extirpation-nation-how-much-of-the-us-will-be-habitable-in-50-years

Transition Ferndale should be able to do a lot to create the local resislent economy. We should do much more than we have so far.

As far as the dangers of nuclear catastrophe are concerned, the local aspect of that is Detroit Edison’s Fermi site. Fermi 1 was already a disaster, still not cleaned up and decommissioned 4-1/2 decades after its 1966 meltdown. Fermi 2 is the world’s largest example of the General Electric Mark 1 design, the exact same type of reactor that melted down 3 times at Fukushima in 2011. The one sitting in Monroe, about 35 miles from the center of Ferndale, can suffer the same kind of meltdown as the ones at Fukushima, for all the reasons mentioned in the article referenced above. And finally, Detroit edison is trying to get financing and licences to build Fermi 3, which is supposed to be a new and entirely untested design.

The Alliance to Halt Fermi 3 is a coalition organization just recently formed for the purpose of stopping Fermi 3 from being built. The organization so far has had one public event, on December 7 in Dearborn. It has registered a website (http://athf3.org/) which so far has one page, on which you are encouraged to send in your e-mail address if you want to support further action.

The next meeting of Transition Ferndale will be 7:00 pm Wednesday, December 19, 2012 at the Ferndale Library. We’ll be showing a video, “Bailout,” a new look at the still unresolved financial crisis which came to a head in 2008 and the economic crisis which is still unfolding. Discussion follows the video. It’s free and open to the public, and not just for residents of Ferndale. Anyone interested in the subject is welcome to attend.

Art Myatt

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